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Viewer of the Week

Eva and Ken Wolke

August 20, 2017

Poetic License

We're assuming this is Peterson 2. It's a Hancock County plate the Icon spotted on a black Ford Expedition EL at the Bluffton Community Swimming Pool.

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Live life to the fullest

I have a relative, a friend, and a preacher-man acquaintance, all with a neurological disease: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. No wonder I found myself in a doctors office reading a book about artists with one of these neurological conditions. The point of this article is to encourage those who have a progressive disease, neurological or otherwise, not to give up, test your talents, and live life as fully as possible every day. Even if you yourself don't have such a condition, you probably know someone who does.
The book found in the doctor's office is titled "Visions: Artists Living with Epilepsy," edited by Steven C. Schacter, head of neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School. Impressive.

But just as impressive is the fabulous artwork depicted in the oversized book...and the people who produced the art.

The artists are young people as well as those with some age on them, those who began drawing as a child and those who discovered their talent after diagnosis.

Each artist has a personal statement. These statements are encouraging but truthful. The artists had difficult days, they admit to that. But overall, their statements are encouraging to others.

As Dr. Schacter wrote, "...I hope you will come to believe that people with epilepsy are capable of wonderful accomplishment."
The Preface author, Eric Harris, Epilepsy Foundation president, wrote, "Living with any disability is a daily challenge." He continued, "It isn't what these artists can't do, but what they can do---and do magnificently---that moves their lives forward and fulfills their spirits."

If you are interested in the art/disability connection, check out the book, mentioned above, through interlibrary loan (or buy it for about $100).
Go to the MS website at Mymsaa.org
or the Parkinson's website at Pdf.org